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Antarctic Marine Protection Torpedoed

Hobart, Australia; Friday 27th October 2017: Discussions and agreements were stalled and blocked for many Antarctic marine issues considered at the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). CCAMLR was considering proposals on marine protected areas and climate change in addition to its usual work on compliance and enforcement.

A proposal put forward by Australia, the EU and France for a Marine Protected Area (MPA) in East Antarctic waters since 2010 did not gain the required consensus. Despite good faith attempts by delegations supportive of the proposal to understand and address their concerns, Russia and China could not come to an agreement with other CCAMLR Members.

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“Anything is Possible”

by Sara Holden

This morning on the first day of the annual meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) in Hobart, the chair was asked the question on all our minds – will the East Antarctic Marine Protected Area be adopted this year? “Anything is possible, if we all cooperate”, replied Monde Mayekiso.…

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The Fragility of Antarctica

 

by Claire Christian

The collapse of the Larsen C ice-shelf is a reminder that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are very fragile environments, with the land, waters and marine life increasingly impacted by the effects of climate change. There are differing views on the specific cause of the Larsen C ice-shelf collapse, but there is no doubt that greater protection for the Southern Ocean is needed.…

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#Antarctica2020 – A Vision for The Future

2020 marks the bicentenary of the discovery of Antarctica. I can think of no better way to celebrate this occasion than by putting in place a system of MPAs in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. #Antartica2020 therefore represents a future for the Antarctic and Southern Ocean that keeps the icy continent a place of environmental protection, peace and science.…

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Go Further …

Decades of political, scientific and campaigning experience and expertise gathered in Paris at the Oceanographic Institute to explore Antarctica, Today and Tomorrow. In his opening video message, His Serene Highness, Prince Albert II of Monaco, noted that securing agreement on the Ross Sea marine protected area has inspired us to use our experience, “to go further”.…

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France, Australia and the EU Can Lead in Protecting Antarctica and the Southern Ocean

In 2009, 24 countries and the European Union (EU) agreed to a bold plan to create a circumpolar network of marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica by 2012. As Members of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR), they took the first step towards fulfilling that commitment by designating the Ross Sea Marine Protected Area (MPA) in 2016, which will come into force in December 2017.…

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After a winter trip to Antarctica, I want to protect it even more

By Ryan Dolan

Ryan Dolan is an officer with The Pew Charitable Trusts’ global penguin conservation campaign.

THREATS TO KRILL, PENGUINS, AND OTHER SPECIES SHOW THE NEED TO SAFEGUARD THE SOUTHERN OCEAN

The coast of Antarctica is a breathtaking kaleidoscope of ever-shifting light and colors. In the twilight of the austral winter, for a few hours every day, the sea ice turns a fiery orange as shadow puppets trace the cracks across slow-moving waves.…

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International Conference: Antarctica Today and Tomorrow (in Paris on June 29th)

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn about the distant land of Antarctica.

The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Coalition is hosting a one-day conference in Paris on June 29th to celebrate France’s leadership in the protection of Antarctica.

Antarctica Today and Tomorrow will address the environmental challenges facing Antarctica and the Southern Ocean and discuss the opportunity posed by the creation of an East Antarctic Marine Protected Area.…

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